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How to talk to kids about difficult subjects

How to talk to kids about difficult subjects

Welcome to the fifth blog of our family survival kit for creating a better work/life balance while working from home. In this blog, we would like to offer you tips on how to talk to kids about difficult subjects. In this blog we will focus on talking to children about the Coronavirus but you can use these tips for all kinds of difficult subjects.
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Welcome to the fifth blog of our family survival kit for creating a better work/life balance while working from home. In this blog, we would like to offer you tips on how to talk to kids about difficult subjects. In this blog we will focus on talking to children about the Coronavirus but you can use these tips for all kinds of difficult subjects.

Why do we need to talk to our children about difficult subjects?

Why do we need to talk to our children about difficult subjects?

Simple because it gives children a sense of security. Children are experts in picking up signals from parents when there is something going on. They may not be able to understand what is going on but they will notice that something is up. If we don’t explain to them what is going on, children can start to feel insecure or scared because they don’t understand what it is that they are noticing. So we as parents need to explain to our children what is going on in an age-appropriate way.

What is the right moment?

What is the right moment?

Pick a moment in which your child can feel relaxed. For children these often are moments when they are doing something like drawing, helping in the kitchen, sitting in the backseat of a car or bike. These are the moments in which your child doesn’t need to make eye contact with you. Eye Contact is something that often creates more tension for children which doesn’t help when you want to talk about difficult subjects.

What to say?

What to say?

Make sure you keep your explanation short and age-appropriate. By keeping it short you will be able to leave more time for answering questions your child might have. But more importantly to listen to what your child has to say about the subject. The goal here is to let your child know that he can talk to you about anything. This means that the focus should be on what your child wants to know or say about the subject.

For instance; While your child is helping you prepare food in the kitchen you could say “So you have noticed that some things have changed because of the Coronavirus. If you have any questions about that, I would be happy to answer them. Do you know what corona is? “ Let your child talk. Then give a compliment for what he has just said and ad some information about the subject. “wow, you already know a bit about this”, “it is true that corona is something that you can not see, smell or hear but does exist”. “Some people can get really ill from it and some people don’t” etc

When to stop?

When to stop?

Children are very capable to let us parents know when they have had enough of the conversation. They often do this by all of sudden changing the subject or by running away or start playing with something else. Make sure you respect this. It is your child’s way of saying “thank you, but that is enough for now”. It is best to leave it and maybe start the conversation again at another time.

So make sure you explain to your children what is going on, for instance about the coronavirus. This will provide kids with a sense of security. Feeling secure helps kids to be more relaxed. And we all know that a relaxed child creates more balance within your child and also for you as a working parent.

Remember, working parents you are amazing!

If you have any questions; please feel free to contact us for an online parenting coaching session.